G from DV – Better Than Before

The Clearinghouse’s Graduated from DegreeVerify (or G from DV) service helps schools meet National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) graduated status reporting requirements. Beginning mid-October, G from DV users can see which degree records have not had a graduation record generated.

G from DV is a no-cost add on to our free DegreeVerify verification service that schools can select to utilize. Schools send the Clearinghouse a degree file, which is loaded into our degree verification database. When the degree file is loaded into our degree verification database, we create a file of graduation records, based upon the degree records submitted, for students who meet the conditions.

When our new enhancement goes live mid-October, schools can access an exportable list of students who did not have a G applied to their enrollment records. After the degree file is processed, schools can login to our secure site and:

  1. Select the Student Reporting tab
  2. Click the Degree Transmission link
  3. Click the Degree Transmission History tab
  4. Select from 3 tabs: Detail, G Applied (an exportable list of students to whom the Clearinghouse applied graduated status), and G Not Applied (an exportable list of students who did not have a graduated status applied to their enrollment record.

This feature will make it easier for schools to assess, update, and correct their enrollment records to stay in compliance.

If you have questions or need assistance, please contact the Clearinghouse at 703.742.4200 (select options #7, #4) or service@studentclearinghouse.org.

We also invite you to “Join the Journey” as the Clearinghouse gets a head start on our 25th anniversary as your trusted partner in 2018 with an academic year filled with new events, services, and more.

Resources

Audit Peak Season Is Here: How to Find the Answers You Need

The Clearinghouse’s Audit Resource Center (ARC) is hard at work during this peak audit season. As many of our participating schools are currently undergoing their annual A-133 compliance audit, the ARC is fielding inquiries as quickly as possible and with urgency. However, because this is the peak summer season, our response time may be delayed by three business days. Therefore, we wanted to provide some helpful resources to you that you can use to answer your compliance- and audit-related questions.

  • Download and/or print our Audit Guide and the Clearinghouse’s most recent annual audit. Our annual audit is currently underway, so we’ve also provided you with a bridge letter you can use until it is completed and published to our web site.
  • Visit our Frequently Asked Questions. These are the most common questions we’ve received from schools and auditors and may assist you quickly in answering your question.
  • Log onto our secure online portal to view:
    • Student Reporting Details, including:
      • Transmission History
      • NSLDS Reporting (Enrollment Reporting to NSLDS)
    • Student Look-Up Details:
      • Enrollment reporting history, including the information your school submitted for the student, as well as the information sent to NSLDS for the student
  • Understand the 60-day, timely reporting requirement. Per the Department of Education (ED), “accurate and timely reporting” requires Title IV aid recipient enrollment to be certified every 60 days, at a minimum. ED’s requirement aligns with that of the Code of Federal Regulations to report students who “ceased to be on at least a half-time basis,” as stated in regulations 610/685.309.
    • Therefore, to comply with federal reporting requirements, you must submit a Student Status Confirmation Report (SSCR) a minimum of every 60 days. On your behalf, the Clearinghouse complies with this requirement by scheduling an SSCR every month of the year.
  • Count the 60 days from the Date of Determination. Per federal requirements, after a student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time, an institution has 60 days from the date of determination to report the student’s enrollment to NSLDS. The date of determination is the date your institution became aware of the student’s enrollment status change. Typically, the date of determination is subsequent to the effective date of the enrollment status.
  • Select the most comprehensive search options when reviewing student information on NSLDS.In order to confirm your reporting timeliness, make sure you choose the optimal selections from the “Advanced Display Options” drop-down menus on the NSLDS “Enrollment Detail” screen.
    • Select all active and inactive records for all schools, then click “Apply.” These search conditions will yield the most comprehensive details, including the first instance when NSLDS accepted an enrollment status and its corresponding effective date.

Thank you for your continued collaboration as we work together to create another incredibly successful academic year. For any other questions, please contact auditresource@studentclearinghouse.org.

Resources

NSLDS Statistics:

Compliance Central
Audit Resource Center blog
Clearinghouse Academy

Watch the Recording of Our Popular “Preparing for Your Annual Audit” Webinar

We reached maximum capacity with our recent webinar, “Preparing for Your Annual Audit.” If you missed it, you can watch the recording on demand.

In 30 minutes, you’ll get a better understanding of:

  • Reasons annual audits are conducted
  • How data flows between the Clearinghouse, lenders, and the NSLDS (National Student Loan Data System for Students)
  • Resources available to colleges and universities through the Audit Resource Center

Watch the recording now.

3 Things to Remember When the Auditor Visits

  1. Select the most comprehensive search options when reviewing student information on NSLDS. In order to confirm your reporting timeliness, make sure you choose the optimal selections from the “Advanced Display Options” drop-down menus on the NSLDS “Enrollment Detail” screen.Select all active and inactive records for all schools, then click “Apply.” These search conditions will yield the most comprehensive details, including the first instance when NSLDS accepted an enrollment status and its corresponding effective date.
  2. Understand the 60-day timely reporting requirement. Per the Department of Education (ED), “accurate and timely reporting” requires Title IV aid recipient enrollment to be certified every 60 days, at a minimum. ED’s requirement aligns with that of the Code of Federal Regulations to report students who “ceased to be on at least a half-time basis,” as stated in regulations 682.610/685.309.Therefore, to comply with federal reporting requirements, you must submit an SSCR a minimum of every 60 days. On your behalf, the Clearinghouse complies with this requirement by scheduling an SSCR every month of the year.
  3. Count the 60 days from the Date of Determination. Per federal requirements, after a student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time, an institution has 60 days from the date of determination to report the student’s enrollment to NSLDS. The date of determination is the date your institution became aware of the student’s enrollment status change. Typically, the date of determination is subsequent to the effective date of the enrollment status.

Don’t Let Audit Season Sneak Up On You!

Start planning now with these quick tips to help you review your compliance reporting and prepare for audit season.

1.     Review your schedule of transmissions with the Clearinghouse.

2.     Review your “History of NSLDS SSCRs Processed by the Clearinghouse.” This will show you when the Clearinghouse processed your school’s most recent enrollment reporting roster.

3.     Review the data within your SIS system.

  • Are withdrawal dates accurate?
  • Are student SSNs correct?
  • Are status changes captured properly?
  • Is program-level enrollment status calculated properly to match campus-level enrollment status?

4.     Periodically review sample students on the Clearinghouse secure website to ensure their enrollment history is accurate.

5.     Review your policies and procedures to make sure they are up to date and accurate!

6.     Engage your colleagues: how can your whole team help contribute to compliance? Is there a periodic monitoring process you can develop and  execute as a team?